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All observing logs for month 2007-03 (earliest log first).

2007-03-02


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-02 13:20 UT
To: 2007-03-02 13:25 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 10.7C ...
Dew Point: 3.2C ...
Humidity: 60% ...
Wind Speed: 5.5mph ...
Wind Dir: South South West ...
Pressure: 1001.4hPa ...
Notes:

Mostly cloudy day. During a clear spell I took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-02 13:20 UT
To: 2007-03-02 13:25 UT

Active area 944 was still visible and looked more or less the same as it did during the last observation.


2007-03-03


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-03 13:00 UT
To: 2007-03-03 13:05 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 11.1C ...
Dew Point: 5.8C ...
Humidity: 71% ...
Wind Speed: 3.3mph ...
Wind Dir: West ...
Pressure: 1003.9hPa ...
Notes:

Mostly clear day. Took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-03 13:00 UT
To: 2007-03-03 13:05 UT

Active area 944 was still visible and looked more or less the same as it did yesterday.

Location: Woodland Waters (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-03 20:10 UT
To: 2007-03-04 01:12 UT
Equipment: Naked Eye
Antares 905
Meade 10x50 Binoculars
Notes:

Very clear and pretty cold night. Arranged to meet up with John Turner at Woodland Waters to observe the total lunar eclipse. I took along my Antares 905 and a pair of 10x50 binoculars and John brought his Sky-Watcher Explorer 130M mounted on an EQ5 mount.

Saturn

From: 2007-03-03 20:10 UT
To: 2007-03-03 20:50 UT

After setting up I started out with a brief look at Saturn (given that the umbral phase of the eclipse wouldn't be starting for a short while). The first thing I noticed was that seeing seemed to be very steady. The view of Saturn in the 905 with the 6mm eyepiece was nice and sharp.

The shadow of the rings on the planet seemed obvious and I kept getting a good hint of the Cassini Division. Titan was easily visible and, off to the other side of Saturn, closer than Titan, there appeared to be another moon visible. Checking with Starry Night I suspect it was Rhea.

Total Lunar Eclipse

From: 2007-03-03 21:00 UT
To: 2007-03-04 01:12 UT

Having observed Saturn for a while I turned to observing the lunar eclipse.

At 21:04 UT I had the impression that there was less visible contrast between the highland and lowland regions of the Moon. This was especially noticeable on the side of the Moon that was heading towards the Earth's umbra. By 21:24 UT this loss of contrast had become much more noticeable and there was obvious darkening of the part of the lunar surface that was deepest in the Earth's penumbra.

At 21:30 UT the umbral phase started and, very quickly, it was obvious where the umbra was. To the naked eye it looked like part of the Moon had gone missing. Via the 905 detail was still visible in the umbra, it looked like a very dark gray shadow.

I noticed that Tycho had been fully consumed by the shadow at around 21:48 UT. I noted at this point that the umbra seemed very dark (much darker than I remember it looking during last year's partial eclipse), dark gray to almost back looking in places. I also noted at this point that the sky was obviously getting darker and that my shadow was starting to fade.

Around this time I started to take a few afocal images, via the 905, with my mobile phone. Few turned out that well but the following is an example of one of the better ones:

Total Lunar Eclipse

By 22:05 UT we were about way towards totality and I was starting to notice a slight red/brown hint to the umbra. In the 905 the umbra showed no colour, still just a dark gray.

At 22:16 UT, via the 905 and with the 10mm eyepiece, I could see a star quite close to the Moon. This star hadn't been visible before so it seemed pretty clear that a lot of the Moon's glare had gone now. Checking with Starry Night it appears that it was 56Y Leonis (HIP53449, TYC261-384-1).

By 22:32 UT I was starting to see a hint of red/brown colour in the deepest part of the umbra when viewing via the 'scope. The redness was now very obvious to the naked eye. By this point it was looking like it was going to be a reasonably dark eclipse.

At 22:44 UT it was obvious that totality had begun. Although there was an obvious hint of redness to the Moon with the naked eye it wasn't that red. There was an obvious difference in brightness between the part of the Moon that was towards the edge of the umbra and the part that was deepest in the umbra. By now the sky was a lot darker — many more stars were visible, as were the more obvious deep sky objects such as the Double Cluster and M44. I could no longer see my own shadow and, unlike earlier in the evening, I now needed a light to be able to move around safely.

Mid totality was around 23:20 UT. On the Danjon scale I would estimate that the brightness of the eclipse was L2.

At 23:32 UT I observed a short and bright meteor head south of Auriga in the direction of Orion.

By 23:35 UT it was obvious that the brighter part of the shadow had "swung" around to the edge of the Moon that would exit the umbra.

By 23:58 UT the first bright patch was visible to the naked eye, totality had ended.

Around 00:09 UT I took a few more afocal shots of the Moon, via the 905, with my mobile phone. The best of the bunch is this one:

Total Lunar Eclipse

Around 00:17 UT it was obvious that the sky was starting to brighten again. M44 was still visible but much harder to see than it had been during totality. I could also see my own shadow again.

At 00:24 UT, with the Moon about way out of the umbra, some thin cloud started to move in front of the Moon. While it didn't put a stop to observing it was a cause for concern given that thicker could cloud be seen towards the west.

Around 00:36 UT I watched Tycho emerge from the umbra. Also, around this time, I noticed a star pretty close to the lit limb of the Moon (the limb that had already emerged from the umbra). By the looks of things it seemed like it might actually be occulted by the Moon before the Moon was clear of the umbra. I decided to stay at the eyepiece and see how long I could follow the star.

Later checking suggests that I was watching 59 Leonis (HIP53824, TYC268-1064-1). From my location this star would not be occulted by the Moon but would come very close. Western parts of the UK would see an occultation.

At 00:39 UT I noticed that the objective lens of the 905 was starting to badly mist up (this might have started happening some time ago but it was now very obvious due to the glare from the brightening Moon).

The star was still just visible at 00:49 UT, although I now struggling to see it in the glare of the Moon. I carried on watching it for as long as I could and I lost it, very close to the Moon's limb, at 01:01 UT. It appeared to have been occulted (but see the note above).

By 01:04 UT the sky was now very bright again, only the brightest of stars were visible and I could no longer see the naked-eye deep-sky objects I'd been able to see earlier. I could also now walk around without the aid of a torch without any danger of bumping into anything.

I started to pack up during the final moments of the Moon exiting umbra and, at 01:12 UT, I watched the Moon finally move out of the umbra. Now cold and tired we finished packing up and called it a night.


2007-03-05


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-05 13:15 UT
To: 2007-03-05 13:20 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 10.3C ...
Dew Point: 3.9C ...
Humidity: 65% ...
Wind Speed: 0.6mph ...
Wind Dir: West ...
Pressure: 1043.8hPa ...
Notes:

Partly cloudy day, also quite hazy. Took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-05 13:15 UT
To: 2007-03-05 13:20 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-06


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-06 13:35 UT
To: 2007-03-06 13:40 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 13.3C ...
Dew Point: 3.8C ...
Humidity: 53% ...
Wind Speed: 4.4mph ...
Wind Dir: West ...
Pressure: 993.2hPa ...
Notes:

Very clear day. Took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-06 13:35 UT
To: 2007-03-06 13:40 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-07


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-07 14:35 UT
To: 2007-03-07 14:40 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 11.5C ...
Dew Point: 5.1C ...
Humidity: 64% ...
Wind Speed: 3.5mph ...
Wind Dir: West ...
Pressure: 999.2hPa ...
Notes:

Mostly cloudy day. Had a very brief clear spell so took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-07 14:35 UT
To: 2007-03-07 14:40 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-08


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-08 13:10 UT
To: 2007-03-08 13:15 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 13.1C ...
Dew Point: 4.9C ...
Humidity: 58% ...
Wind Speed: 4.0mph ...
Wind Dir: South South West ...
Pressure: 1018.9hPa ...
Notes:

Very clear day. Took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-08 13:10 UT
To: 2007-03-08 13:15 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-09


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-09 12:45 UT
To: 2007-03-09 12:50 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 11.8C ...
Dew Point: 3.5C ...
Humidity: 57% ...
Wind Speed: 6.1mph ...
Wind Dir: West ...
Pressure: 1022.5hPa ...
Notes:

Mostly clear day. Took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-09 12:45 UT
To: 2007-03-09 12:50 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-10


Location: Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge (Cambridgeshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-10 11:15 UT
To: 2007-03-10 11:20 UT
Equipment: Thorrowgood Telescope
Notes:

While attending the 2007 Society for Popular Astronomy Convention at the Institute of Astronomy I took a telescope tour. The Thorrowgood telescope was set up to project the Sun so I took the opportunity to do a sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-10 11:15 UT
To: 2007-03-10 11:20 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-13


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-13 14:00 UT
To: 2007-03-13 14:05 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 13.6C ...
Dew Point: 3.6C ...
Humidity: 51% ...
Wind Speed: 4.2mph ...
Wind Dir: West South West ...
Pressure: 1027.1hPa ...
Notes:

Very clear day. Took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-13 14:00 UT
To: 2007-03-13 14:05 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-14


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-14 14:05 UT
To: 2007-03-14 14:10 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 15.0C ...
Dew Point: 5.2C ...
Humidity: 52% ...
Wind Speed: 0.6mph ...
Wind Dir: West ...
Pressure: 1031.4hPa ...
Notes:

Very clear day. Took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-14 14:05 UT
To: 2007-03-14 14:10 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-18


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-18 11:35 UT
To: 2007-03-18 11:40 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 9.1C ...
Dew Point: -0.1C ...
Humidity: 53% ...
Wind Speed: 10.9mph ...
Wind Dir: North West ...
Pressure: 996.8hPa ...
Notes:

Very mixed day, stormy at times. During a brief clear spell I took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-18 11:35 UT
To: 2007-03-18 11:40 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-19


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-19 14:00 UT
To: 2007-03-19 14:05 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 7.8C ...
Dew Point: -2.0C ...
Humidity: 50% ...
Wind Speed: 8.8mph ...
Wind Dir: West North West ...
Pressure: 995.2hPa ...
Notes:

Another very mixed day, stormy at times (much like yesterday). During a brief clear spell I took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-19 14:00 UT
To: 2007-03-19 14:05 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-20


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-20 14:10 UT
To: 2007-03-20 14:15 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 4.3C ...
Dew Point: 0.9C ...
Humidity: 79% ...
Wind Speed: 9.9mph ...
Wind Dir: North ...
Pressure: 1012.5hPa ...
Notes:

Mostly cloudy day with some rather stormy conditions at times. During a brief clear spell I took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-20 14:10 UT
To: 2007-03-20 14:15 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-21


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-21 13:15 UT
To: 2007-03-21 13:20 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 7.9C ...
Dew Point: 0.1C ...
Humidity: 58% ...
Wind Speed: Calm ...
Pressure: 1017.3hPa ...
Notes:

Partly cloudy day. During a clear spell I took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-21 13:15 UT
To: 2007-03-21 13:20 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.

Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-21 19:20 UT
To: 2007-03-21 19:30 UT
Equipment: Canon EOS 400D
Temperature: 4.5C ...
Dew Point: -1.6C ...
Humidity: 65% ...
Wind Speed: Calm ...
Pressure: 1016.7hPa ...
Notes:

The Moon and Venus were very close to each other in the western sky this evening so I decided to have a go at photograping them with my Canon EOS 400D.

Photographing the Moon and Venus

From: 2007-03-21 19:20 UT
To: 2007-03-21 19:30 UT

I went out with my Canon EOS 400D and set it up on a tripod and ran off a series of shots. Given how bright the Moon and Venus were I didn't need to use very long expopsures. Annoyingly I appear to have got the focus slightly wrong (I do find it tricky to manually focus the kit lens for astrophotography work

I took 12 images in all but the best of the bunch appears to be this one:

Moon and Venus

While it gives a reasonable idea of how the Moon and Venus looked it's nowhere near as crisp as it should be. I can see I need to work some more on manual focusing for astronomical photography.

Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-21 21:25 UT
To: 2007-03-21 22:07 UT
Equipment: Sky-Watcher Explorer 130M
Antares 905
Temperature: 1.6C ...
Dew Point: -3.2C ...
Humidity: 71% ...
Wind Speed: Calm ...
Pressure: 1016.6hPa ...
Notes:

Reasonably clear evening, slightly misty and looked like it might get a little foggy. Decided to take the 130M out for a quick test of a new 2x barlow that I'd purchased a couple of weeks ago at the 2007 Society for Popular Astronomy convention.

Testing new barlow against Saturn

From: 2007-03-21 21:25 UT
To: 2007-03-21 21:47 UT

I started out by getting Saturn lined up in the 130M using the 25mm eyepiece. I then switched to the 10mm eyepiece. The image wasn't too bad — a little unsteady and a little soft but it was possible to make out the shadow of the rings on the planet and also the shadow of the planet on the rings.

Next I added the Sky-Watcher supplied barlow lens and had a look at the image with that. As has always been the case I found it difficult to find good focus and the image was very soft to the point of being unusable. I then switched to the new barlow. Focus was a lot easier to find and, while the image wasn't fully crisp, it appeared to be a huge improvement over the Sky-Watcher barlow.

After comparing them a little more I came to the conclusion that the new barlow would, without a doubt, replace the old one in my lens box. It was a very obvious improvement.

I then tried the new barlow with the 6mm eyepiece. As I expected, the image was rather dull and rather soft but it was obviously much better than with the old barlow. I've seen worse views of Saturn at lower magnifications before now.

Testing With the 905

From: 2007-03-21 21:50 UT
To: 2007-03-21 22:07 UT

Having tested with the 130M I decided to give the new barlow lens a quick test when used in the 905. The main point of this test was to see how well it worked with the diagonal. The old barlow, which has quite a long barrel, didn't work too well as it tended to bang against the mirror. The new one is rather shorter and looked like it wouldn't suffer from this problem.

Got Saturn lined up in the 905 and then dropped the new barlow into the diagonal (and it was a perfect fit, didn't hit the mirror at all). Using the 10mm eyepiece Saturn looked pretty good. Again, it was a little soft (I suspect much of this was down to the state of the atmosphere this evening) but was very acceptable. I also tested with the 6mm eyepiece and, while the image was much darker and softer, it was still better than the worst views I've had in the 130M with the 10mm and the old barlow.

Under ideal conditions I imagine that this new barlow and either 'scope will make for a reasonable combination.

By 22:07 UT it was starting to get very misty and, to make matters worse, smoke from someone's fire was being blown over my garden so, having managed to conduct some quick tests, I decided to call it an evening.


2007-03-23


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-23 14:15 UT
To: 2007-03-23 14:20 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 7.9C ...
Dew Point: 3.7C ...
Humidity: 75% ...
Wind Speed: 3.8mph ...
Wind Dir: North East ...
Pressure: 1015.8hPa ...
Notes:

Mostly cloudy day with some rather stormy conditions at times. During a brief clear spell I took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-23 14:15 UT
To: 2007-03-23 14:20 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-25


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-25 13:20 UT
To: 2007-03-25 13:25 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 11.5C ...
Dew Point: 6.6C ...
Humidity: 72% ...
Wind Speed: 2.2mph ...
Wind Dir: South East ...
Pressure: 1018.7hPa ...
Notes:

Clear but very hazy day. Took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-25 13:20 UT
To: 2007-03-25 13:25 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.

Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-25 19:16 UT
To: 2007-03-25 20:12 UT
Equipment: Antares 905
Temperature: 6.6C ...
Dew Point: 4.2C ...
Humidity: 85% ...
Wind Speed: Calm ...
Pressure: 1020.3hPa ...
Notes:

Reasonably clear evening, if a little damp and misty. Noticed that Venus was visible from the garden and would be for a while to come so decided to quickly get the 905 out to have a look.

Venus

From: 2007-03-25 19:16 UT
To: 2007-03-25 20:12 UT

I quickly got Venus lined up in the 905 with the 6mm eyepiece. Immediately I could see lots of false colour in the image. It was, however, obvious right away that I was looking at a gibbous disk.

To combat the false colour I added the contrast booster and this made quite a bit of difference. The image was quite unsteady, and I could still see a fair bit of red fringing, but the image was sharper than without the filter and the impression that I was looking at something that had a phase was increased.

Next I added the 2x barlow. The image wasn't too bad. There was an increased "rainbow" effect around the planet and the edges were noticeably softer but the overall shape was the same as without the barlow.

I noted at this point that there was no way I'd ever be able to use the 905 to look for the sort of terminator detail that avid Venus observers look for. Likewise I'd never be able to go looking for evidence of the ashen light. However, all that said, with the setup at hand it was obvious that I was looking at Venus (and, as far as I can remember, this was the first time I'd ever looked at Venus with a telescope).

I also noted that I should try observing Venus with the 130M at some point. I would have used it this evening but if I'd brought it out and given it enough time to cool down I'd have lost Venus as seen from the garden.

I removed the barlow and carried on observing with just the 6mm eyepiece. I could still see a fair bit of red fringe, this came and went over time. As an experiment I added #80A medium blue filter to the box (keeping the contrast booster in place) and this seemed to make quite a bit of difference. The view now appeared very crisp with little to no evidence of fringing. This was the best view I had all this session and the phase of the planet stood out very well.

By around 20:12 UT Venus was starting to get quite low for my position, the mist was starting to get thicker and to top it all off smoke from at least one fire in someone's house was starting to drift over my way so I decided to pack up.


2007-03-26


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-26 12:50 UT
To: 2007-03-26 12:55 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 13.5C ...
Dew Point: 7.7C ...
Humidity: 68% ...
Wind Speed: 2.9mph ...
Wind Dir: East South East ...
Pressure: 1018.4hPa ...
Notes:

Very clear day. Took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-26 12:50 UT
To: 2007-03-26 12:55 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-27


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-27 12:35 UT
To: 2007-03-27 12:40 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 13.8C ...
Dew Point: 9.6C ...
Humidity: 76% ...
Wind Speed: Calm ...
Pressure: 1014.2hPa ...
Notes:

The day started out very foggy but cleared somewhat into the afternoon. When it was clear enough I took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-27 12:35 UT
To: 2007-03-27 12:40 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.

Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-27 18:50 UT
To: 2007-03-27 19:45 UT
Equipment: Antares 905
Temperature: 9.8C ...
Dew Point: 5.5C ...
Humidity: 75% ...
Wind Speed: Calm ...
Pressure: 1013.7hPa ...
Notes:

A reasonably clear but slightly damp and misty evening. Although I had to be elsewhere a little later on in the evening I decided to have a quick session observing Venus and, if there was time, a quick look at the Moon (especially given that Rupes Recta would be favourably lit).

Venus

From: 2007-03-27 18:50 UT
To: 2007-03-27 19:10 UT

I first lined Venus up in the 905 using the 25mm eyepiece and then swapped it for the 6mm eyepiece. The image was very indistinct and had lots of blue fringing. I then added the contrast booster and this gave an instant improvement (I can see this becoming a more or less permanent fixture on the 905) with Venus now obviously showing a gibbous phase. There was, however, still some red fringe.

As with my previous session observing Venus I added the #80A medium blue and this eliminated pretty much all of the fringing. Those two filters appear to be a winning combination, at least for something as low down and as high-contrast as Venus.

I then added the 2x barlow and even that wasn't a terrible view. While the image was a little soft there was pretty much no colour fringe to distract from the view. Once again it was very obvious that I was looking at a planet that was displaying a very distinct phase.

I kept observing Venus until around 19:10 UT and then, given that I obviously wasn't going to get anything extra out of the planet, I decided to move on to the Moon.

The Moon

From: 2007-03-27 19:15 UT
To: 2007-03-27 19:45 UT

While I had some time left I decided to have a quick look at the Moon and, in particular, Rupes Recta (something I used to observe a fair bit as a child, back when I was a member of the Lunar Section of the Junior Astronomical Society).

With the 6mm eyepiece (and keeping the contrast booster in place) Rupes Recta was immediately and obviously visible. Just as I remembered it gave the impression of being a large sharp cliff (something it really isn't). Close by I could see Brit and, in the wall of Brit, I could easily see Brit A.

I then added the 2x barlow and the view was still quite good.

Looking at the general area around Rupes Recta I noted that "wrinkles" to the West of Brit, along with other features in the area, give a very strong impression of the whole region being surrounded by the remains of a very circular ghost crater.

About way between Brit and the terminator I could see Nicollet. Further on in that general direction, more or less on the terminator, I could see Wolf.

Pretty much touching the south wall of Thebit I could see a very small crater which I could make out on my map but which didn't have a name marked.

At this point I removed the 2x barlow and carried on using just the 6mm eyepiece.

Further south Tycho looked fantastic with its floor in shadow and its central peak standing out in the sunlight. The shadow of the central peak was also very obvious.

Even further south I could see Clavius cutting into the terminator. Two very distinct craters were visible on its floor, one of which (the eastern most one) was throwing quite a long shadow. I could also make out Rutherfurd, just visible in the wall of Clavius.

Buried right in the terminator, down close to the south pole, I could just make out Newton.

At this point (19:45 UT) my time was up and I needed to call an early end to the session and pack up.


2007-03-28


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-28 14:00 UT
To: 2007-03-28 14:05 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 11.7C ...
Dew Point: 7.6C ...
Humidity: 76% ...
Wind Speed: 3.5mph ...
Wind Dir: North North West ...
Pressure: 1011.8hPa ...
Notes:

Mostly foggy day, didn't clear until quite late into the afternoon. Once it was clear enough I took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-28 14:00 UT
To: 2007-03-28 14:05 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


2007-03-31


Location: Billingborough (South Lincolnshire, UK)
From: 2007-03-31 13:10 UT
To: 2007-03-31 13:15 UT
Equipment: Solarscope
Temperature: 12.9C ...
Dew Point: 5.3C ...
Humidity: 60% ...
Wind Speed: 3.8mph ...
Wind Dir: South South East ...
Pressure: 1023.6hPa ...
Notes:

Clear but hazy day. Took the Solarscope out to do a quick sunspot count.

Sun

From: 2007-03-31 13:10 UT
To: 2007-03-31 13:15 UT

No spots or other marks visible on the Sun.


Page last modified: 2013-04-09 09:19:19 UT
Dave Pearson <davep@davep.org>
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